Science


Featured This Month

New Videos and Podcasts
> more videos and podcasts in Science
Popular Programs
> more popular programs in Science
Science airing this week

Meet Paul Martini, the "iboss". As CEO of iboss Paul's goal is meeting the challenge of safeguarding data in the exponentially expanding universe of bandwidth used in cyberspace. Growing up in the tough heart of Los Angeles, this son of immigrants shares about the influences, experiences, and people that shaped him on his path to success.

The atmosphere is composed of gases such as oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide. Other gases are present at much lower concentrations and include ozone, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides and formaldehyde just to name a few. But there is something else in the air we breathe: microscopic particles called aerosols. Vicki Grassian discusses aerosols, their many sources, and how they impact the Earth's climate and human health in ways we are just starting to understand.

Across the tree of life, we can trace cancer vulnerabilities back to the origins of multicellularity. Cancer is observed in almost all multicellular phyla, including lineages leading to plants, fungi, and animals. However, species vary remarkably in their susceptibility to cancer. Amy Boddy (UCSB Integrated Anthropological Sciences Unit) discusses how this variation in cancer susceptibility is characterized by life history trade-offs, as cancer defense mechanisms are a major component of a body's maintenance. She also looks at how understanding these trade-offs in the context of evolution may help explain the variability we see in cancer susceptibility across human populations. Recorded on 07/18/2018.

This symposium addresses the interactive gene-culture co-evolution of the human brain with tool use and technology - ranging from simple stone tools millions of years ago to computers today. Recorded on 10/12/2018.

Scientist Karl Wahlin is hoping to use the tiny retinas he's developed from stem cells to find a cure for blindness. Wahlin has teamed up with UC San Diego Stem Cell Program Director Alysson Muotri, who is using a similar technique to study the brain. Together, they hope to understand how the brain and the eye influence one another's development.

The human brain contains approximately 86 billion neurons, and 100 trillion connections between those neurons. Despite our inability to image each neuron and determine their exact connective patterns, several approaches for noninvasive imaging of the living brain have been developed and utilized to great benefit. LLNL scientist Alan Kaplan explores the immense landscape of the human brain and quantifies the brain in terms of data flow. Then describes engineering applications of recorded electrophysiological data and explores methods for analyzing such data to determine the pattern of signals that arise during various activities and mood states. Recorded on 02/09/2019.

Collapsing ice shelves and calving of large icebergs in Greenland and Antarctica have recently become major drivers of sea level rise. The rapidity of these changes has come as a surprise, revealing major gaps in our understanding of how ice sheets respond to a changing climate. To a large extent, these gaps are due to the lack of measurements from the marine edge of glaciers - the Achilles' heel of glaciers. For over a decade, since the glaciers in Greenland began their retreat, Fiammetta Straneo and her group at Scripps Institution of Oceanography have been probing the edge of massive calving glaciers in iceberg-choked fjords in Greenland using helicopters, icebreakers, fishing vessels, and autonomous vehicles. The understanding gained through these measurements is being used in models aimed at improving sea-level rise predictions. Recorded on 05/13/2019.

The science of stem cells allows us to understand our genome by comparing our own genome to that of our ancient cousins – the Neanderthal.

The motion picture William is a story about a Neanderthal living among modern humans. The director of the UC San Diego Stem Cell Program Alysson Muotri was able to visit with the creator and director, Tim Disney, to discuss the real issues explored by this fantasy.

The science of stem cells and how they impact your health.
Sign up for UCTV's monthly e-newsletter:
contact
contact info

feedback

privacy

watch
where to watch

videos & podcasts

live stream

retransmission

more info
about uctv

faqs

program contributors

university of california

sitemap

follow



©2016 Regents of the University of California. All right reserved. Terms and Conditions of Use.